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Merit Question and Answer
Help with Dyslexia, Processing, and Short Term Memory Issues



QUESTION:

Area of Concern: Reading Comprehension
Submitted by: Parent
Grade Level: High School
Competency: Below Level
I have a 15 yr old child with several academic learning disabilities: dyslexia, processing, and short term memory difficulty. Are any of these programs set up to help. Will he be able to do these independently?



ANSWER:

Merit programs are designed to help learning disabled students succeed, and recent research shows that Merit Software helps struggling students significantly increase their scores on high stakes standardized tests.

The new Merit Text talker program is very helpful for dyslexic students. When students get stuck on a reading passage, they are able to hear the text read to them. Each word is highlighted as it is pronounced, so it is easy to follow along.

Merit will also help your son overcome his difficulties with short term memorization and processing information. All Merit programs provide contextual feedback and tutorials throughout the lesson. This helps students learn strategies for reading and finding information.

Merit lessons teach students to grasp the main idea, follow the sequence of events in a story, and infer meaning from the text. Once students have mastered these and other basic reading strategies, they are much less reliant on rote memorization when they read.

Your son will certainly be able to work on these programs independently. I would start with Developing Critical Thinking Skills for Effective Reading.


RECOMMENDED LINKS:

Based on your question, Merit Software recommends the following programs:

Merit Software's Solutions lists many more programs can help with your educational success. For a complete list, please visit Merit Solutions.

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Important Disclaimer:
Answers and comments provided are general information and are not intended to substitute for informed professional medical, psychiatric, psychological, or other professional advice.

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